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Author Topic: Vitamin D Supplements Appear to Be Associated With Lower Mortality  (Read 3061 times)

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Offline John2038

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Yes, my 3rd post today. But reading for me, shared for you  ;)


Les Lang
Nov 2007
 
Individuals who take vitamin D supplements appear to have a lower risk of death from any cause over an average follow-up time of 6 years, according to a meta-analysis of 18 previously published studies in the September 10, 2007, issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
 
Past studies have suggested that deficiencies in vitamin D might be associated with a higher risk of death from cancer, heart disease, and diabetes-illnesses that account for 60%-70% of deaths in high-income nations, according to background information in the article. "If the associations made between vitamin D and these conditions were consistent, then interventions effectively strengthening vitamin D status should result in reduced total mortality," the authors write.
 
Dr Philippe Autier, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France, and Dr Sara Gandini, of the European Institute of Oncology, Milano, Italy, searched for randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplements published before November 2006. They analyzed 18 separate trials that included 57,311 participants and evaluated doses of vitamin D ranging from 300-2000 IU, with an average dose of 528 IU. Most commercially available supplements contain between 400 and 600 IU.
 
Over an average follow-up period of 5.7 years, 4777 participants died. Individuals who took vitamin D had a 7% lower risk of death than those who did not. In the 9 trials that collected blood samples, those who took supplements had an average 1.4- to 5.2-fold higher blood level of vitamin D than those who did not.
 
"Mechanisms by which vitamin D supplementation would decrease all-cause mortality are not clear," the authors write. Vitamin D could inhibit some mechanisms by which cancer cells proliferate, or it may boost the function of blood vessels or the immune system, they note. "In conclusion, the intake of ordinary doses of vitamin D supplements seems to be associated with decreases in total mortality rates," the authors write. "The relationship between baseline vitamin D status, dose of vitamin D supplements and total mortality rates remains to be investigated. Population-based, placebo-controlled randomized trials in people 50 years or older for at least 6 years with total mortality as the main end point should be organized to confirm these findings."
 
The meta-analysis "adds a new chapter in the accumulating evidence for a beneficial role of vitamin D on health," writes Dr Edward Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, in an accompanying editorial. "Research on vitamin D should be continued to clearly elucidate the specific benefits and optimal intakes and levels of vitamin D," Dr Giovannucci continues. "Nonetheless, based on the total body of evidence of health conditions associated with vitamin D deficiency, abetted with the results from this meta-analysis, a more proactive attitude to identify, prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency should be part of standard medical care. From a broader public health perspective, the roles of moderate sun exposure, food fortification with vitamin D and higher-dose vitamin D supplements for adults need to be debated."
 
For more details, see "Vitamin D supplementation and total mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials," Arch Intern Med 2007;167:1730-1737; 1709-1710.    

Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D Supplements Appear to Be Associated With Lower Mortality
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2007, 07:19:40 PM »
I think it's quite worthwile to ask your doctor to run a vitamin D level if you can. This is especially true if you are sedentary and don't get out much in the sun, as many office workers. Certain HAART drugs and anti depressants can lower vitamin D levels too. And you get less and less with age. I was found to have a very low D level of 12 ng/ml back in january 2007. Normal range is 30 to 100. The RDA for vitamin D is 400 IU/day. I took 1200 IU /day for 6 months. It did almost nothing - the D level was 15 ng/ml after that. My doc gave me 50,000 IU per week for 3 months. My D level shot up to over 70, which was good. Right now I'm at 47 and taking about 5000 IU/day to maintain my level. You will probably need to take extra calcium if you supplement with D.

Yes, my 3rd post today. But reading for me, shared for you  ;)


Les Lang
Nov 2007
 
Individuals who take vitamin D supplements appear to have a lower risk of death from any cause over an average follow-up time of 6 years, according to a meta-analysis of 18 previously published studies in the September 10, 2007, issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
 
Past studies have suggested that deficiencies in vitamin D might be associated with a higher risk of death from cancer, heart disease, and diabetes-illnesses that account for 60%-70% of deaths in high-income nations, according to background information in the article. "If the associations made between vitamin D and these conditions were consistent, then interventions effectively strengthening vitamin D status should result in reduced total mortality," the authors write.
 
Dr Philippe Autier, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France, and Dr Sara Gandini, of the European Institute of Oncology, Milano, Italy, searched for randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplements published before November 2006. They analyzed 18 separate trials that included 57,311 participants and evaluated doses of vitamin D ranging from 300-2000 IU, with an average dose of 528 IU. Most commercially available supplements contain between 400 and 600 IU.
 
Over an average follow-up period of 5.7 years, 4777 participants died. Individuals who took vitamin D had a 7% lower risk of death than those who did not. In the 9 trials that collected blood samples, those who took supplements had an average 1.4- to 5.2-fold higher blood level of vitamin D than those who did not.
 
"Mechanisms by which vitamin D supplementation would decrease all-cause mortality are not clear," the authors write. Vitamin D could inhibit some mechanisms by which cancer cells proliferate, or it may boost the function of blood vessels or the immune system, they note. "In conclusion, the intake of ordinary doses of vitamin D supplements seems to be associated with decreases in total mortality rates," the authors write. "The relationship between baseline vitamin D status, dose of vitamin D supplements and total mortality rates remains to be investigated. Population-based, placebo-controlled randomized trials in people 50 years or older for at least 6 years with total mortality as the main end point should be organized to confirm these findings."
 
The meta-analysis "adds a new chapter in the accumulating evidence for a beneficial role of vitamin D on health," writes Dr Edward Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, in an accompanying editorial. "Research on vitamin D should be continued to clearly elucidate the specific benefits and optimal intakes and levels of vitamin D," Dr Giovannucci continues. "Nonetheless, based on the total body of evidence of health conditions associated with vitamin D deficiency, abetted with the results from this meta-analysis, a more proactive attitude to identify, prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency should be part of standard medical care. From a broader public health perspective, the roles of moderate sun exposure, food fortification with vitamin D and higher-dose vitamin D supplements for adults need to be debated."
 
For more details, see "Vitamin D supplementation and total mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials," Arch Intern Med 2007;167:1730-1737; 1709-1710.    

Offline jportland

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Re: Vitamin D Supplements Appear to Be Associated With Lower Mortality
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2008, 03:58:57 AM »
This acticle ( unrelated) came out just yesterday... showing that the SUN produces the most vitamin D of any source... It also states in a way how overly crazy people have been about avoiding the sun becuz of skin cancer, when in fact it may be causing them more harm than good in doing so! So... head to the beach people and lay out in the sun cuz it's good for you!!!  8)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080107/hl_nm/cancer_sun_dc
2001 tested neg
8/2002  seroconvert
9/2002 Tested Poz
No Meds
2/2003 302/25% 76K
9/2004 463/23% 14K
8/2005 342/22% 19K
7/2006 381/29% 24K
3/2007 386/34% 34K
3/2008 230/21% 269K
3/2008  Started Meds
7/2008 485/23% VL 140
9/2008 465/24% VL Undetectable
1/2010 581/29% VL Undectectable

Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D Supplements Appear to Be Associated With Lower Mortality
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2008, 06:41:04 PM »
Hi,

This acticle ( unrelated) came out just yesterday... showing that the SUN produces the most vitamin D of any source... It also states in a way how overly crazy people have been about avoiding the sun becuz of skin cancer, when in fact it may be causing them more harm than good in doing so! So... head to the beach people and lay out in the sun cuz it's good for you!!!  8)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080107/hl_nm/cancer_sun_dc

It is not crazy. Some of us have very sensitive skin. This is my case. I have over 100 moles on my body. My dermatologist has told me that I should wear SPF 15 even in winter time to prevent skin cancer. My skin only knows two colors - pale white, or bright red, nothing in between. And I know the bright red is not good - that happens when I go in the sun in the summer without sunblock, and it sure hurts like hell. If I use sunblock I just remain pale white.
So for me, the vitamin D supplements are the best option. I have my levels monitored regularly to make sure they are OK. I found the optimal dose to be about 4500 IU per day for me.

 


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