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Author Topic: AIDS/LifeCycle  (Read 7194 times)

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Offline pozattitude

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AIDS/LifeCycle
« on: September 25, 2007, 01:04:42 PM »
... will take place June 1-7, 2008, as cyclists and volunteers will travel 545 miles through beautiful California from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and I am going to do it.

I just bought me a road bike and I am riding it to work everyday.  Now I will start riding it on the weekends and start getting ready.
If anyone in the SF bay area is interested in joining me let me know. 
Are you ready JohnOso?

Rich
(who has not been up on a bike since 1995) ::)


POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline RobT

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2007, 07:46:22 PM »
Good for u!

Rob


Current meds: Atripla
VL: undetectable
CD4: 630

Offline sacinsc

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2007, 10:30:59 PM »
Shortly  ( I hope) I will have my bike back. I wanted to do the ride last year but then my boss said no (bitch) didnt matter anyway since that week I seroconverted and wasnt feeling to well. Would really love to have the chance to do it this year. Where can I find out more information?

Matt
March 07 - Negative
May 07 - Exposed
June 07 - Seroconversion
September 07 - CD4 402 VL 118000 25%
October 07 -     CD4 294 VL 124000 22%
November 07 - Norvir, Triuvada and Reyataz
December 07 -  CD4 355 VL  550 .... guess the meds are working.
January 08 - CD4 446 VL <48 undetectable!
April 08 - CD4 554 VL <48 undetectable!
July 08 - CD4 666 VL <48 undetectable! Hporay...I have devil CD4's

Offline pozattitude

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2007, 10:50:02 PM »
you can find more info and register for the event if you want at

http://www.aidslifecycle.org/index.html


Rich
POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline leatherman

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2007, 01:17:49 AM »
After many years, I just got myself a new bike this past week. Although I didn't forget how to ride it; I didn't realize how out of shape I was.  :o So I've been working in slow increments and am up to a mile a day. It may not be much progress but it IS progress.  ;)

Your event sounds like a grand adventure and I wish you the best luck!
Keep us posted so we can cheer for ya!

mikie
(who would probably keel over trying to bike 545 miles through hilly Ohio ;D)

leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline sacinsc

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2007, 09:53:27 PM »
Going to start training as soon as I get my stuff outta storage...and that will be when I find a damn job, somewhere other that SC!
March 07 - Negative
May 07 - Exposed
June 07 - Seroconversion
September 07 - CD4 402 VL 118000 25%
October 07 -     CD4 294 VL 124000 22%
November 07 - Norvir, Triuvada and Reyataz
December 07 -  CD4 355 VL  550 .... guess the meds are working.
January 08 - CD4 446 VL <48 undetectable!
April 08 - CD4 554 VL <48 undetectable!
July 08 - CD4 666 VL <48 undetectable! Hporay...I have devil CD4's

Offline JohnOso

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2007, 03:14:02 PM »
Rich,

sorry i didin't see your thread before now... :P

I'm going to the informational meeting at Berkeley on October 16 (my birthday!  ;)), but i still haven't picked out a bike yet.

Went to REI and got a few pointers....I was all hyped up to get a mountain bike so I could also take it out to Briones Regional Park out here, but got the kibosh put on that.  Will probably end up getting some sort of hybrid, and a cheapie mountain bike for the trails.

Keep me posted!

John

Offline pozattitude

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2007, 04:30:54 PM »
I ended up buying a road bike, and cheap...well under $500.00.
I wanted a mountain bike too, but after talking to some people I opted for the road bike, but now I found out that the mountain bikes are probably better on the hills... ???  >:(  oh well...maybe I'll have 2 bikes...  ::)
oh...also bought me a pair of cycling shorts...they are... oh so tight....  ::)

Rich
(who likes looking at cyclists legs and butts very much)
POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline JohnOso

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2007, 03:24:26 AM »
I was stoked about the mountain bikes, but everyone tells me that that fat tires and shocks will eat up a lot of your effort on the long rides...ergo you're pedaling a helluva lot more than you would on a regular road bike.

But like you say, mountain bikes are good for the hills...so who knows?

The Berkeley meet is at Mike's Bikes, so hopefully I can get a few more questions answered there.

And yeah, like I could fit this fat ass into a pair of bike shorts....  :P

Cheers,
John

Offline Hard Times

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2007, 12:26:32 PM »
i have an 21 speed all terrain street bike , tires with tread on the sides. the correct handle bars help a lot too.
i gues its time to dust it off, & start peddling around town.
i,m 47  , i wonder if i could ever get back in shape for a ride like that ??
to bad there wasn't a shorter ride some wheres !
Your Body Is What You Are.
Your Soul Is Who You Are.

Offline pozattitude

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2007, 12:40:53 PM »
Hi Tommy,

I know a 60 year old who have done this ride.  47...you are  still young darling  :D
I had not been on a bike since 1995 and I have to admit I was shocked ( and not in a good way)...I thought just because I can walk/hike very long distances that biking would be a piece of cake...boy was I wrong...I forgot I had some of the muscles on my legs, thighs and butt (specially my butt)...you have plenty of time to start training, check out the LifeCycle website and their  training guide...get started and wait until March to see how you feel and if you think you are up to the challenge, you can register anytime until May 2008 I think..
but remember...check with your doc before starting this..make sure you don't need to pay attention to any special needs.  I for example have PN and will have to pay close attention to the pain and manage that well if I want to complete this ride... I also have problems with my sugar so I have to eat every 2 hours or my sugar crashes and I can faint.
But I am thinking of the great benefits...I will get good aerobic exercise and help lower my cholesterol and my ass should look PURRFECT by June...I want to be able to bounce quarters off my ass by the time I am ready for this ride...oh and the legs too should be nicely sculpted by that time too.

Rich
POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline Hard Times

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2007, 01:22:24 PM »
rich,
thanks for the reply.   i'm shooting for 2009  life cycle . i'll give it one hell of a try. if all fails , i'll be a roadie.
TIME FOR A MIGRAIN,  must go now       Tommy
Your Body Is What You Are.
Your Soul Is Who You Are.

Offline leatherman

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2007, 01:36:15 PM »
I had not been on a bike since 1995 and I have to admit I was shocked ( and not in a good way)...I thought just because I can walk/hike very long distances that biking would be a piece of cake...boy was I wrong...I forgot I had some of the muscles on my legs, thighs and butt
;D At 45 that's what I thought at first too. So did my partner (who's 51). The first try on the bike two weeks ago, I went around the "big" block. Got off and could hardly walk  ;D Jim, who chose to go around the "smaller" block, woke us up in the middle of the night screaming "charley-horse".

i gues its time to dust it off, & start peddling around town.
i,m 47  , i wonder if i could ever get back in shape for a ride like that ??
to bad there wasn't a shorter ride some wheres !
As long as you take into consideration any health problems, like Rich mentioned, sure you can! Just take it slow and build up to it. After that first try, I've been adding a "block" a day. Just biking around the neighborhood, I'm up to two miles a day now - and feeling good afterwards. ;D

I've got a goal of reaching our friend's house about 4 miles away; but there are two BIG hills between here and there, so it's going to be a bit longer till I get that far. ROFL
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline cayucosguy

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2007, 02:04:37 PM »
For the past few years I've been providing massages & support at the evening stop-over at the Paso Robles fairgrounds, and then part of the team cooking the BBQ lunch at next day's stop in San Luis Obispo.  So I know that I will see you there!

Honestly though, I don't know if I have the motivation to begin training for the ride.  I would most likely do okay if I had someone to train with... never been one to stick-with-it when I'm flying solo, although I routinely do 5 mile a day rides (from work to home - the bike goes in the back of my buddies truck in the wee dark hours).

My hat is off to any and everyone who attempts this feat!

Offline JohnOso

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2007, 09:03:33 PM »
For the past few years I've been providing massages & support at the evening stop-over at the Paso Robles fairgrounds, and then part of the team cooking the BBQ lunch at next day's stop in San Luis Obispo.  So I know that I will see you there!


PARTY AT VINCE'S!!   ;D

Offline pozattitude

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2007, 12:31:47 PM »
Okay, I am an official participant of this event.
I registered and I have my participant number, it is 1850!!!!! 
I met my cycle buddy at the Castro Street Fair yesterday and I also met a member of Positive Pedalers ( a group of HIV + cycling enthusiasts which I am now also a member) and I will be riding with them to L.A.

I am an emotional time bomb, I don't know why, maybe it is that time of the month  ::)  I cried yesterday at the fair  :-[ , I cried because when I was asked why I am doing this ride, I said the "typical"...raise awareness and funds for HIV/AIDS and to:
A) challenge myself to accomplish a task I didn't think I would ever be able to complete, or even get prepared to do such a thing. 
B) to honor the lives of all of those who have passed before us.
this is when I just lost it.....my buddy asked how finishing this ride or even just the preparation for the event would make a difference in my life... I shared my story with her of how I had been "dead" for the past 10 years and now I am just "waking up" and finishing this ride will prove me that I am in control of my future, not HIV,  and that I did not want to forget the horrors of the early years because I believe if I can't let go of  the pain, struggles and losses of those early years.  I can't let go of it because if I do, I will forget those who fought for change so that we could be here today.  I will never forget them, they are my heroes and I will make sure that they will be forever remembered.
Another thing that is making me feel emotional is the fact that I am riding as a Positive Pedaler.  I am out to my parents, friends and anyone I meet outside work, but riding as a pozzie I will be coming out to the World.
My employer and all my co workers will know and all my relatives too.  I am keeping a blog for this event to share my experience with everyone, I have also shared my story with Logo TV and they may be interested in doing a story about this.
I think maybe what is happening is that those 10 yrs of silence and secrecy I kept bottle up are finally coming out.  Although I have shared my story with my parents (the most difficult thing I've done so far) and my friends in the past 3 years, I never dealt with all the things I kept bottled up for so long.  I think I am finally dealing with all those emotions I have avoided for so long and that is a good thing because this means that I am moving forward.
Now I have to personalize my homepage for AIDS LifeCycle and get my blog started.  I will keep you posted and share my experiences from start to finish.
For more info or if you want to check out my page the link is
http://www.aidslifecycle.org/1850

Thank you for listening.

PS...Vince...does that mean John and I don't have to sleep in tents that night we are in your area?  ;)




POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline leatherman

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2007, 05:46:15 PM »
Excellent, Rich! I just bookmarked your blog and will definitely keep watching for your updates. ;D

It sounds like you're taking a good positive step forward in life. That's always a good thing to do. It'll make you feel better and give you a good reason to get up every day. ;)
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline JohnOso

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2007, 03:37:10 AM »
Rich,

signed up for the big dance tonight at Mike's Bikes.  my friend has already raised $1200 !!!!!!!

i'm still figuring out a goddamned bike to buy.   i'll certainly play the aids card as much as possible in my quest for $$$, lol!

John

Offline pozattitude

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2007, 12:12:43 PM »
Rich,

my friend has already raised $1200 !!!!!!!

I'll certainly play the aids card as much as possible in my quest for $$$, lol!

John
WOW $1200.....and I was happy that I had $100 so far...I've been concentrating o getting in shape so I can actually complete the ride  ::)   I'll get busy with fund raising starting on Halloween (I have a bet at work if everyone  I work with gives me $25.oo I will go to work in drag that day  ;D  that will be a really scary Halloween.....
Are you going to the training kick off on the 28?  They will raffle a bike there...who knows, you may win it!!!
I wanted to go to Berkley yesterday but the traffic on 880 was HELL and I didn't get out of work until 6pm... I would've never made it from Milpitas...my friend lives in Alameda and it took her 1h to get home yesterday.

Rich

PS......if anyone knows people in the media please tell them about the ride, we need as much media coverage to bring awareness about HIV/AIDS. 

Rich
POSITIVE PEDALERS... We are a group of people living with HIV/AIDS, eliminating stigma through our positive public example.

Offline risred1

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Re: AIDS/LifeCycle
« Reply #19 on: October 21, 2007, 01:09:41 PM »
Here's a helpful Website that has a great way of describing bikes:

http://www.whycycle.co.uk/whatbike.htm

When doing a long charity ride, comfort and speed are the key. Not that you should be going really fast, but it should be able to move you along easily with low rolling resistence. The point is to finish and finish comfortably so that even though your tired, you can do it again the next day.

For that alone, you really need a Road or Hybrid or Touring bike that is designed for you to put in a 6+ hour ride.

If you want to get into biking for exercise, there are many options from Mountain, Hyrbid, Cross, City bikes that are great for doing just that. If you go off road or want to ride in the woods, or crushed gravel paths, a bike with fat nobby tires is the way to go! There is a huge difference between Trail Riding and Road Riding, and although the cross bike is supposed to bridge that gap, you really have to choose or have both if you like to do both. Most Road Bikes are very difficult to ride off road, and off road bikes are really difficult to ride in the street, especially on a long distance charity ride.

I'm sure the sponsors of the charity event will have classes and training guidelines and recommendations you need to be following if you intend to go on this type of ride. So don't fight it, they are there to help you finish. Pay attention to what they are telling you. The whole point is to enjoy the experience and not to be in so much pain or fatigue that you dread getting back out there the next day!

The most important factor then becomes the relationship between your butt and the seat of the bike.

Finding the right seat is a bit of a mystery. Here is what I have learned.

1) Most Bike seats will do the job. In order for the seat to work well for you, the Bike really needs to fit you properly and setup right. There are lots of websites that talk about fitting a bike to you. You should be familiar with so that if you go into a bike shop, you know if they have a clue as to picking out a bike for you and setting it up.

http://www.cyclemetrics.com/Pages/FitLinks/bike_fit_links.htm

Start with the Basic Fit, that will often be what you will need in selecting a bike and getting a decent ride out of it. Higher end fitting methodologies often exist in the high end bike shops designed to custom fit a bike based upon more than the inseam of your leg, taking into account the length of your torso and even arms.

Having a bike fit you properly is solving the most basic problem with being able to sit in a seat for a long period of time.

2) Bike Pants! - Yes, what is often regaled as a sign of elitism in bicyclists, is in fact a critical aspect in being able to sit in that seat and be comfortable. bike pants with a real honest to goodness chamois, not just a bit of cushion, is not to be overlooked.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/sub_cat.cfm?subcategory_id=1120

performancebike shorts have been my choice because of the price and performance of these shorts. I started with the Elite shorts and for the last ride I did, I moved up to the Ultras. Their top seller, the Century Gel is of interests. But here is the thing about gel, soft isn't always better than firm. Your wieght is your wieght weather it is on a firm or soft surface, soft surfaces may be initially more comfortable, but the point is that you have to ride 75 to 100 miles a day, what is initially comfortable over time, may become worse as the pressure points with gel may actually be more irritating. I almost chose the gel, but when the Ultra went on sale, I went with that. I generally ride with the elite shorts as the chamios is great on training rides of under 50 miles.

I'm considered a heavy rider, using XL pants, so make sure you get pants that will fit you, you will be surprised how tight they are initially, but it will be fine. You will feel particularly exposed. Essentially, its like wearing speedos to ride a bike in. But the comfort they provide and that they are cool to ride is the way to go on these long rides. If you are embarrased to be be seen in bike pants, you can do what  friend of mine does, he wears gym shorts over them.

3) So you have a bike that fits you and you have good bike pants, what seat should you use. If you are planning on riding these long distances, you really need to figure our what works, which when you look at all these seats, one can find it impossible to choose.

The key here is the objective. Fundementally, its about what you call you Sit Bones, actually called the ischial tuberosities. Ideally the seat is where you rest your sit bone on to avoid having soft tissue in the groin area doing all the support. If you look at modern racing seats, they look like there would be no comfort in that design. Well it depends, if you can get your sit bones to actually be on the seat, then your soft tissue will not need to hold you up. A seat too narrow where your sit bones are not on the seat proper, can be very very uncomfotable on a long ride. And a seat that is too wide can cause chaffing, another really bad thing. (oh, bike pants help alot in this regard!). Now if you are heavy and have, frankly, a wide butt, that does not mean your sit bones are necessary wide. So don't necessary go for the wide seat.

Hear is what I'm using, and I just switched to this, so I don't know yet if this is the answer: But it is interesting.

http://www.performancebike.com/E3saddle.cfm

Oh, you do have to toughen up! That comes with training. But at some point, if you are riding a fair amount, and you have the pants and the bike fitting you correctly, and if you are still sore or uncomfortable riding, try another seat! Many stores know that it is a mystery which one you will find comfortable. Some will let you exchange. You will find a seat where you can enjoy riding these long distances and not be thinking about how sore you are. And lastly, you will and do get sore. The point is that it shouldn't be debilitating. On a road bike, my hands often get sore or numb from doing a long ride. Being able to carry wieght on my hands does take pressure off the butt, but means that they are carrying wieght which causes the numbness. I shake my hands off frequently while riding a long distance, it does come with the territory.

Of all the rides that you can take, it is the long flat rides you will find that will make your butt the sorest. When you are riding hills, you change the pressure points considerably, which actually provides relief. When you get on a long flat, your just sitting there in the same position, which can cause you to be more sore. Having the right pants, seat and bike does make a substantial difference in have a good ride and a ride from hell.

4) Lubrication, hey, I use a product call Chamios Butt'r. Yup, that's right. using a chamois cream does help. So on those long rides, remember to add some lubrication. (I can hear the synapse's  clicking out there! Despite the sexual overtones of using lubrication on a long ride, it does make a difference, especially on mutli day rides!

I hope this provides a bit of help. Fundamentally, the sponsors should be providing guidelines for those who wish to take these long rides. It is not a race! But you do need to be in pretty good shape to do it. This does not mean you have to be some skinny 135lb bike riding machine. You might be very surprised at the number of big bear like guys, woof!, who ride. The low impact of bike riding in fact is something that favors us bigger guys as running is just too hard on the joints. The key is getting your legs ready but most importantly your cardio strong enough to last for 6+ hours. The key is training. But also it is understanding that it is not a race. While you may train pretty hard to get ready, the key is to learn to ride slow enough, to keep your heart rate down on these long rides. Having a heart rate monitor is a big help to regulate your training and to help you on a long ride from getting caught up in the moment and going to fast on day one and burning out your cardio reserve.

Good luck on your rides and learning how to enjoy riding a bike. For us POZ folks, it is a great way to exercise and to feel good and to enjoy things like these long charity events. Its good to have these challenges out in front of you. Just because your POZ doesn't mean you can't do stuff. Being on a bike is one of those things to be in control of what you can control.

Oh, and you may, will cry when you finish. You will be elated. But when you think about what you've accomplished and why you rode and the impact that you are having for those who cannot ride, it will be a signature moment in your life.











risred1 - hiv +
02/07 CD4 404 - 27% - VL 15k
10/07 CD4 484 - 31% - VL 45k
05/08 CD4 414 - 26% - VL 70k
01/09 CD4 365 - 23% - VL 65k
05/09 CD4 291 - 23% - VL 115k - Started Meds - Reyataz/Truvada
06/09 CD4 394 - ?% - VL 1200 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
07/09 CD4 441 - ?% - VL 118 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
09/09 CD4 375 - ?% - VL Undetectable - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
12/09 CD4 595 - ?% - VL Undetectable - VIT D 34 - Reyataz/Truvada/Norvir

 


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