HIV Transmission and Testing > Am I Infected?

CFS really a false negative?

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tachyon:
OK... this is a weird theory... but people with Chronic Fatigue Symptoms have basically all the symptoms of HIV. Could it be that certain strains of HIV resist detection? So, CFS is really just a false negative test?

So... if you're tested negative, you're still not certain...

jkinatl2:
I have not seen any scientific data to suggest that CFS in any way interferes with an ELISA test at thirteen weeks past suspected exposure.

You are indeed correct about symptoms, though as someone with both viruses, I would not compare CFS to acute retroviral syndrome (serconversion sickness) but rather to chronic HIV infection, experienced months or years past seroconversion,  but before opportunistic infections.

tachyon:
I've neglected to properly state my theory. What I meant was:

Suppose a patient is tested (false) negative for HIV; he has chronic HIV infection symptoms, and perhaps is certain of blood transmission from an infected person. Since the test results show false, the doctor deems the patient to have CFS (based on the common symptoms, this is the next best diagnostic).

I am assuming that there is a possibility of false negative even at the chronic stage. Doing a quick google search, it appears that the articles do not forbid the possibility. Though they claim the chance is low, they do not eliminate it completely. Therefore, it is possible.

Also, I'm not sure if you can safely state that you have both viruses -- a CFS virus has yet to be isolated, and in fact, many doctors believe CFS to be a myth. So, I believe the diagnosis of CFS is subjective from doctor to doctor.


--- Quote from: jkinatl2 on July 03, 2006, 11:46:46 PM ---I have not seen any scientific data to suggest that CFS in any way interferes with an ELISA test at thirteen weeks past suspected exposure.

You are indeed correct about symptoms, though as someone with both viruses, I would not compare CFS to acute retroviral syndrome (serconversion sickness) but rather to chronic HIV infection, experienced months or years past seroconversion,  but before opportunistic infections.



--- End quote ---

jkinatl2:
Actually, I tested positive for the Epstein-Barr virus, which is widely implicated in CFS. It was that virus to which I refer.

As for your HIv test, the ELISA test would not be negatively influenced by the presence or absence of another virus. Though in rare cases the ELISA reacts to other, similarly proportioned viral antibodies, the followup Western Blot will rule out HIV infection (as will a subsequent viral load and other more specific testing).

If anything, the ELISA test sometimes pull a false positive due to other pathogens, but not, at the appropriate window period, a false negative.

In short, the answer is no. Your HIV negative result is definitive so long as it has been three months or more since your last unprotected encounter.

tachyon:
I'm still worried about how the EB virus has yet to be isolated -- just because your test shows certain antibodies might not mean you have EB, for sure... might these antibodies be the manifest result of a combination of other viruses?

Moreover, it's the same with the HIV virus -- it's still in need of isolation.

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