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Author Topic: not sure  (Read 2946 times)

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Offline crazed

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not sure
« on: June 04, 2007, 09:08:42 AM »
Hi all. My question has been weighing on my mind for a few months now. A few months ago I went to an ear, nose and throat doctor for some sinus issues. He went to examine me and realized he did not have a flexible tube to use in the room ( this tube I assume is made of rubber and has a camera on the end so that when inserted in the nose they can have a better view of what is going on). He went into another room and came back with a tube and proceeded to wipe it down with an 70% isopropyl alcohol pad. I know these tubes usually sit in some type of sterilizing solution ...I did see one in this solution in my room...the dr. said that one was too big for my nose. My question is assuming the one he used on me was not sterilized between the last patient and myself ( i have no way of knowing if it was sterilized or not because it came from another room ) would the alcohol wipe have been enough to kill hiv or hep. being that the nose is a mucous membrane?  I know dr's are expected to follow a certain protocol but anyone can make a mistake. I keep thinking maybe he grabbed one that was used and waiting to be sterilized not realizing that another doctor had already used this one.  The office had a large staff...many dr's and technicians.
   i do have another question... if someone stepped on a used syringe at the beach what are the chances of contracting hiv or hep?    Thank you in advance.

Offline RapidRod

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Re: not sure
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2007, 09:42:24 AM »
Your risk of getting infected by being scoped is zero. The chance that you stepped on a needled syringe at the beach is zero for HIV. Now tetanus is a different story. If you did step on a needle, make sure you are up to date on your tetanus shots.

Offline Andy Velez

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Re: not sure
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2007, 10:13:37 AM »
And before you make yourself anymore crazed (unnecessarily) than you have already, read our lesson on Transmission. THere's a link to it in the Welcome thread which opens this section. You get all the basics there. This epidemic is going to be around for a longtime to come so you need to become better informed.

Cheers,
Andy Velez

Offline crazed

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Re: not sure
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2007, 10:23:05 AM »
Thank you for your prompt reply. May I be so bold ast to ask Andy and Ann for their opinions. So am I safe to assume the alcohol would have killed any virus on the scope? Also, I did not step on a needle thank goodness , but was having a conversation with someone who read about someone who recently did at a beach. I am confused as to how there is a difference between this and someone who did accidentally at a healthcare setting or injecting drugs for that matter. Studies have shown that blood can remain viable in these syringes for a few hours to a few days with no oxygen getting to it. So assuming someone used the syringe relatively recent to the time the other person stepped on it , maybe a few hours,   then how is this not possible. Just asking with all due respect as you are the experts and I am not. sorry also just saw a reply from andy while i was typing thanks.

Offline crazed

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Re: not sure
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2007, 09:35:53 AM »
Hi all. I was wondering if Andy or Ann would answer my question. It may be silly but nonetheless I'm nervous. I recently took my young daughter to the eye doctor for an eye exam .The technician put some drops into her eyes and my daughter flinched  and the dropper bottle hit the inside of her eye. These bottles are used repeatedly on patients and the tech didn't wipe the top off either. In the event that this happened to another patient before my daughter and they had either hep or hiv , is this considered a risk? It was a contact with mucous membrane and therefore I'm not sure if this is considered a risk. thank you.

Offline Andy Velez

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Re: not sure
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2007, 12:10:01 PM »
I don't know that I would characterize your questions as silly. Rather I would say you are most definitely worrying unnecessarily. There's never been a documented case of transmission in the manner you're concerned about in relation to your daughter's eye exam. It's safe to say she won't make history by becoming the first.

All healthcare settings for some time have employed univeral healthcare precautions against HIV transmission among other things.

Your various inquiries are essentially in the "what if" category rather than any real risk situations. HIV is a fragile virus that is not transmitted easily. Sexually it's essentially about unprotected vaginal or anal sex. Outside of the sexual arena, sharing of needles for drug use and some healthcare work accidents like puncture with a needle can be risky. But those are quite different from what you are presenting and which situations such as foot punctures walking on a beach have NEVER been a source of transmission.

If you can't get off of this kind of worrying then I suggest you talk with a counselor about your concerns because you don't have any serious basis in HIV science for them.

Cheers,
Andy Velez

Offline crazed

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Re: not sure
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2008, 10:18:08 PM »
Hi all. If Ann or Andy would answer this I would really appreciate it. About 5 weeks ago my daughter came down with a viral fever ( thats what her doc called it). It went away but she relapsed about 10days later with the same thing. At this point her pediatrician wanted to do blood work to rule out any infection. We waited in the waitiing room because there was another child in the lab having blood work done. When they came out I saw the nurse that was going to do the blood draw for my daughter go in . A few minutes later she called us in. When we got in the lab there was what appeared to be a clean paper towel with soaked cotton, blood tubes and a butterfly needle . The needle was already out of the package and I know those needles come in a package. There was however a plastic piece covering the needle. i asked the nurse why the needle was not packaged and she said that she had just taken it out...I did not see any package anywhere. Stupidly i let her continue. I did not see any visible blood on the needle or in the tubing , well, at least that I could tell. I know that I will be told that needles are never reused in medical facilities and in an ideal world they would not. But, mistakes are made. I keep thinking that the nurse before used that needle on another patient ,then put the plastic back on forgot it on the table and then told our nurse that that one was a new needle. Mistakes do happen, as I've read that there have been cases of needle reuse. My questions are 1.If the needle was reused what are the chances of hiv or hep transmission 2.would there necessarily be blood in or on the needle.3 is it common for a nurse to set up and even unpackage a needle before the patient gets in the room? oh, and she wasn't able to get a vein with that needle so she had to get another one and then got it. This also made me nervous because I was told that if a needle was reused it would not draw blood..as that needle did not. Please reply I have been so sick over this because it is about my daughter. Also her blood work results showed a viral infection and not a bacterial infection ...not sure if that was something to do with this. Thank you

Offline RapidRod

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Re: not sure
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2008, 10:24:51 PM »
The lab tech did not reuse the butterfly. If you would have looked at the tubing you would have seen it had not been used. Yes, when you remove a butterfly from the package it has a plastic needle protector on it. After it is use the butterfly is discarded in a sharps container. They don't recap the end of the needle.

Offline Ann

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  • It just is, OK?
    • Num is sum qui mentiar tibi?
Re: not sure
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2008, 03:50:46 AM »
Crazed,

I suggest that rather than posting on the internet about your paranoia concerning the medical profession and hiv, you see a therapist about it. We cannot help you with this type of mental health issue. And yes, that's exactly what it is. A mental health issue.

As Rodney points out, they do NOT replace any plastic coverings on needles, they put them straight into a sharps container for their own safety.

Please seek help. You don't have to live with this paranoia.

Ann
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline crazed

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  • Posts: 5
Re: not sure
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2008, 10:43:04 AM »
Hi all. I know these questions all sound crazy and paranoid.But the fact remains that I am quite concerned because it concerns my child.People do make mistakes even in the medical field. There have been cases I've read about whether they are true or not it makes you think. I was under the impression that a nurse or lab tech was supposed to open everthing up in front of the patient. Do you think it is odd that the needle was already out of the package? Also Rod mentioned the tubing would show if it was used, but the first time the nurse tried on my daughter she could not get any blood therefore no blood in the tubing ....this could have happpened with the patient before also hence there would be no visible blood there. I am sorry for all of this .I am just trying to justify why everything was already opened before we got in there. Thank you again.

Offline Ann

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  • It just is, OK?
    • Num is sum qui mentiar tibi?
Re: not sure
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2008, 11:09:56 AM »
Crazed,

Our opinions are not going to change concerning this matter. Mistakes like what you're imagining just don't happen - and they NEVER put the plastic cap back on a needle. Maybe you should be talking to the person who performed the procedure if you're still worried. That, and seek out a therapist for your high state of anxiety. We cannot help you further here.

Ann
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline RapidRod

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  • Posts: 15,288
Re: not sure
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2008, 11:16:40 AM »
You are being irrational. There is nothing out of the norm to have the needles out of the package, in your case the butterfly. Most places set up in advance for the next patient. When I go to the lab to get tested everything is out waiting. Vials, butterfly, vacuum container, rubber tourniquet, alcohol prep, gauzes and a Band-Aid.

 


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