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Oldest known person living with hiv

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worriedfriend:
From what I read, this disease is so strange as one person may need to be on heavy medication for YEARS, then Joe Smo, who has had it from 20yrs doesn't need any meds and is doing great.  that must make this disease so hard as there isn't a SET group of steps to do, not everyone takes the same meds and does the same stuff.  It sure would be easier if this disease wasn't so damn smart.  Who knows, just a thought you know.

milker:
Newly diagnosed people are very lucky to have access to medication that is a lot less heavy . Our LTS friends have had to endure much more than we newbies will have to go through. But the fight is not over.

Milker.

Andy Velez:
A wonderful artist I know in SF, who was one of the panelists on a LTS panel which I chaired back in the early 90s, has been HIV+ for over 30 years. He's also one who has been a longtime non-progressor. No adverse changes in his health and he's not on meds and I still hear from him regularly.

He's not the only one. When I was doing research on the subject at that time, it was amazing how many people got in touch who were then well into a second decade of good health. I think Dr. Susan Buchbinder in SF Health is still following up on many of them and continues to study the various factors which may make a difference in maintaining good health.

With the continuing development of effective new medications and knowledge about other factors which maintain good health I see every likelihood of lifespans with HIV continuing to expand. That's why I get mad when I hear someone say their doctor has tossed off some shortterm prediction when I continue to see so much evidence which points to the contrary. Of course if someone is newly diagnosed and has apparently been HIV+ for an extended period before being diagnosed, that can make a big difference in prognosis. That doesn't mean there aren't problems as we well know. But as a general matter I am increasingly hopeful about longevity numbers for those living with HIV.

OzPaul:
As has been suggested, you might want to take a look at the Long Term Survivors forum. There are many folks with courageous and interesting stories of having lived a long lives while being HIV positive.

I'm one of several AM Forum members here who are termed Long Term Non Progressors (LTNP). It is estimated that LTNP's make up about .3 % of HIV positive people. I've been positive since 1981. I'm now 48 years old.

It seems to me that taking each day as it comes and living life to it's fullest will at least in the short term help give one a more optimistic outlook and possibly enjoy life 'in the now'.

Cheers
Paul

Miss Philicia:

--- Quote from: Andy Velez on April 23, 2007, 07:18:28 PM ---A wonderful artist I know in SF, who was one of the panelists on a LTS panel which I chaired back in the early 90s, has been HIV+ for over 30 years. He's also one who has been a longtime non-progressor.

--- End quote ---

Just out of curiosity, how does one actually figure this out with any degree of certainty?  The virus has only been scientifically identifiable for 23 years.

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