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Immigration/Ryan White questions

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lydgate:
I'm not a US citizen, though I would eventually like to live here permanently. Go through the process of an H1-B visa, then hopefully green card. I know I'd have to get an HIV waiver. Are those stupendously difficult to obtain? Does anyone know the numbers -- how many people apply for an HIV waiver and how many actually succeed in obtaining that waiver?

I'm a grad student, not exactly overpaid. I qualify for Ryan White funds (not limited to US citizens and permanent residents). But I'm thinking I shouldn't apply for or use Ryan White funding -- so that I can prove to the DHS and other government agencies that I've never used any public funds. I know I have to prove "prospectively" that I won't in the future use public health money; by not using Ryan White money, I can show that I've never relied on public funds. Is that sound logic?

And how the hell do you "prove" that you're of "good moral character"?!

lydgate

Oceanbeach:
Dear Lydgate,

RWCA funds are not distributed equally.  They are allocated in Titles I, II, III, and IV.  I would not be able to answer all of your questions but with the name of the City and State you reside in I can help a little.  Have the best day
Michael

www.Commission-on-AIDS.org  Some of the issues can be found here.

gerry:

--- Quote ---I'm not a US citizen, though I would eventually like to live here permanently. Go through the process of an H1-B visa, then hopefully green card. I know I'd have to get an HIV waiver.
--- End quote ---

The process is not as simple or straightforward compared to if HIV was not in the way.  First, your situation has to be under one of these categories for the HIV waiver:

"Asylees, refugees, special immigrant juveniles, and those who applied through the legalization program may apply for an HIV waiver based on "family unity, humanitarian purposes or public interest" concerns.

Other applicants who do not fit into the categories above may apply for an HIV waiver if they are:

    * husbands or wives of US citizens, lawful permanent residents, or people with immigrant visas waiting to process their permanent residence cards;
    * unmarried sons and daughters of US citizens, lawful permanent residents, or people with immigrant visas waiting to process their permanent residence cards;
    * parents of US citizens, lawful permanent residents, or people with immigrant visas waiting to process their permanent residence cards; or
    * battered spouses or children of US citizens or lawful permanent residents."


--- Quote ---I qualify for Ryan White funds (not limited to US citizens and permanent residents). But I'm thinking I shouldn't apply for or use Ryan White funding -- so that I can prove to the DHS and other government agencies that I've never used any public funds.
--- End quote ---

I believe if you use it mainly for medical care, it might not be counted against you.

"In recent years, many noncitizens decided not to apply for public benefits that they or their children needed because they feared it would harm their immigration status. To clear up confusion, in May 1999, the former INS issued field guidance on public charge to all immigration offices. The guidance clarified that an immigrant's use of non-cash benefits, such as health care (except long-term care) will not be considered in public charge determinations.'

Source: National Immigration Project

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