Quantcast
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
June 29, 2016, 03:31:39 AM

Login with username, password and session length


Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 694788
  • Total Topics: 54850
  • Online Today: 210
  • Online Ever: 585
  • (January 07, 2014, 02:31:47 PM)
Users Online

Welcome


Welcome to the POZ Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

Privacy Warning:  Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If you are HIV positive and disclose this in our forums, then it is almost the same thing as telling the whole world (or at least the World Wide Web). If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.

  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.

  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.

  • Forums members must behave at all times with respect and honesty. Posting guidelines, including time-out and banning policies, have been established by the moderators of these forums. Click here for “Am I Infected?” posting guidelines. Click here for posting guidelines pertaining to all other POZ community forums.

  • We ask all forums members to provide references for health/medical/scientific information they provide, when it is not a personal experience being discussed. Please provide hyperlinks with full URLs or full citations of published works not available via the Internet. Additionally, all forums members must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge.

  • Product advertisement—including links; banners; editorial content; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from POZ.

To change forums navigation language settings, click here (members only), Register now

Para cambiar sus preferencias de los foros en español, haz clic aquí (sólo miembros), Regístrate ahora

Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 10
51
Am I Infected? / Re: Risk assessment- worried
« Last post by Daydream1792 on Yesterday at 01:43:39 PM »
Folks , one another question. I got to go through my discharge papers after getting pep. It recommends 1 month , 3 months , 6 months 4th gen test after starting pep. I am so confused . I believe 1 month test will be pretty much useless since I would have just gotten of the test. And I also read that pep can result in false positive if taken p24 test so early. Also 6 months seems like one hell of period to wait with anxiety. Please advise. Your help would be much appreciated.
52
Zero viral load  in the blood doesn't mean always zero viral load in the body.
One hypothesis is that you have a quite low CD4 count because there are some areas of your body where the antiretrovirals in Atripla are not arriving in enough concentration, as in some lymphocytes with a severe grade of fibrosis.
The components of Atripla are the Entricibatina, TDF and Efavirenz .
The first two are large molecules, the third one can have a not optimal distribution (there are some studies in the brain: Efavirenz is able to pass through the CSF barrier, but the spreading has some inhomogeneities).

Another hypothesis is that Atripla is interfering with your hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow.
53
Since my last postings in March of 2016, I have switched ARV medications from Atripla to Genvoya. My ID doctor advised that the entricitabine component found in both drugs could be the root cause of my idiopathic paresthesia when I am active, specifically when wearing shoes/sneakers working and exercising. It appears that the burning sensation in both my feet may be caused chiefly by pressure when wearing shoes and/or sneakers on my peripheral nerves that could be inflamed by long-term HIV infection or a side effect of a particular drug. This is one theory. The other theory as proposed by my foot surgeon is metatarsalgia. I was referred to this foot surgeon by my neurologist because he thought I may have neuromas on the balls of my feet, which the foot surgeon ruled out with x-rays and a physical exam. My neurologist doesn’t think my case fits the classic presentation of neuropathy, and after two visits, I have managed to get an EMG ordered by him which should be more conclusive. My EMG is scheduled for June 29th. Upon the EMG findings, I will entertain the prospect of changing my drug regimen to Tivicay & Prezcobix as prescribed by my ID doctor. However, what I find incredibly frustrating is that my ID doctor cannot precisely/definitively provide me with a diagnosis. After he advised me concerning that entricitabine may be the root cause, he counters that it is still very rare and the onus is on me to change my drug regimen. He also advised that we should treat the symptoms with Lyrica. Frankly, I do not want to acquiesce to another drug until I find the root cause. After 31 years of living with HIV, I am finding more and more this kind of vacillation in the decision making processes of my doctors. I still believe that obtaining the most information about any health issue enables me to make more effective and informed medical decisions; however, it seems possible to argue that I have hit a brick wall because my ID doctor is in very new territory and is at a loss to make any definitive diagnosis. I truly believe that Chronic Inflammation due to HIV has blindsided most practicing ID specialists. After 4 years of dealing with bilateral tinnitus, probably caused by Atripla, I am managing to cope; however, this chronic inflammation/burning in my feet is causing me great distress and anxiety. It is truly affecting my work and state of mind.
Sorry for the lengthy post. I am hoping to get some feedback about my situation.
Best,
Rick   
54
Since my last postings in March of 2016, I have switched ARV medications from Atripla to Genvoya. My ID doctor advised that the entricitabine component found in both drugs could be the root cause of my idiopathic paresthesia when I am active, specifically when wearing shoes/sneakers working and exercising. It appears that the burning sensation in both my feet may be caused chiefly by pressure when wearing shoes and/or sneakers on my peripheral nerves that could be inflamed by long-term HIV infection or a side effect of a particular drug. This is one theory. The other theory as proposed by my foot surgeon is metatarsalgia. I was referred to this foot surgeon by my neurologist because he thought I may have neuromas on the balls of my feet, which the foot surgeon ruled out with x-rays and a physical exam. My neurologist doesn’t think my case fits the classic presentation of neuropathy, and after two visits, I have managed to get an EMG ordered by him which should be more conclusive. My EMG is scheduled for June 29th. Upon the EMG findings, I will entertain the prospect of changing my drug regimen to Tivicay & Prezcobix as prescribed by my ID doctor. However, what I find incredibly frustrating is that my ID doctor cannot precisely/definitively provide me with a diagnosis. After he advised me concerning that entricitabine may be the root cause, he counters that it is still very rare and the onus is on me to change my drug regimen. He also advised that we should treat the symptoms with Lyrica. Frankly, I do not want to acquiesce to another drug until I find the root cause. After 31 years of living with HIV, I am finding more and more this kind of vacillation in the decision making processes of my doctors. I still believe that obtaining the most information about any health issue enables me to make more effective and informed medical decisions; however, it seems possible to argue that I have hit a brick wall because my ID doctor is in very new territory and is at a loss to make any definitive diagnosis. I truly believe that Chronic Inflammation due to HIV has blindsided most practicing ID specialists. After 4 years of dealing with bilateral tinnitus, probably caused by Atripla, I am managing to cope; however, this chronic inflammation/burning in my feet is causing me great distress and anxiety. It is truly affecting my work and state of mind.
Sorry for the lengthy post. I am hoping to get some feedback about my situation.
Best,
Rick   
55
In a study outside of HIV, Methylene blue is being revisited.  Early studies in the 70's were conducted on rodents but now are being investigated on humans.  "The results showed methylene blue increased response in the bilateral insular cortex--an area deep within the brain associated with emotional responses..."

Sign me up for trials, lol

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160628072028.htm
56
Hello, I really need some advice, please.

My general practitioner (Physician Assistant) has been pushing me to see an Infectious Disease doctor, so I finally got in to see her today and I was so not impressed. (not the point)

I am currently on Atripla. My CD4 count has been steady in the 370 to 400 range since I became UD in April of last year, 2015. I was diagnosed in July of 2014 and began treatment with Atripla in September 2014.

So, while seeing this new ID doctor today, she also gave me a prescription for "Isentress" 400mg twice a day. She said that this medication, combined with my Atripla will work to improve my CD4 count.

This confuses me. I thought that the medications (in my case Atripla) purpose was to suppress the virus to an UD level so that the body can recover my immune system and therefore increase my CD4 count.

My understanding is that there is no treatment (or pill to take) that can increase ones CD4 count.

It looks like the prescription cost for this medication is almost as much as my Atripla and just wanted some advice before adding on another $1,400 USD pill to my monthly treatment unless it is actually useful.

I tried to contact my general practitioner today to discuss it with him, but he is out of the office all week in the hospital himself, so any advice is appreciated.

Thank you,

POS 
57
Questions About Treatment & Side Effects / Re: Genvoya help!!!!
« Last post by RickDallas on Yesterday at 10:12:46 AM »
Hello Firefighter:
You should have no problem getting a Co-Pay Coupon Card from Gilead. Please use the link that Zach posted for more info. Normally, you can pick up a Co-Pay Coupon card from your healthcare provider, but if you call Gilead at the following number: 1-877-505-6986 you will be able to set up a co-pay assistance account. Once you have set up the account, you simply give your pharmacy the Gilead Co-Pay Card Account information and you are all set. Your co-pay should be completely covered by this program. However, you sometimes need to be diligent and make sure your pharmacy and your healthcare insurance provider are in sync. Confirm with your insurance company what your co-pay is on the Genvoya and then confirm with your pharmacy what they are billing your co-pay card. They should be equal. I switched from Atripla to Genvoya back in March 2016. I was on Atripla for many years. So far the Genvoya has been quite effective in keeping my viral load undetectable. I take my Genvoya in the evening after dinner; however, sometimes I take it with a very light snack when I get home if I have been out for the evening. After taking the Genvoya for 30 days, you should have a follow-up appointment with your healthcare provider with lab work to monitor your progress. Good luck.
Best,
Rick
58
I Just Tested Poz / Re: Learning to Love Myself
« Last post by SFlSurvive on Yesterday at 09:54:17 AM »
Good morning all. So i got my confirmatory test today and I am indeed positive. The nurse said I took it all too well! I went through so many emotions the last two weeks I dont think I can cry anymore. For some reason i feel a burden has been lifted because at least I know now and can take care of myself going forward. Now i am ready to take this head on and get my numbers an take care of myself. I am not going to tell my family rigt now because I want to learn more about it, get my own place and start working again so they dont have to worry. This is a new life for me. I have no insurance so this ASO that I found have been great with getting me started. I definitely want to seek therapy to help me get through all i have gone through in the past so I can be a better person. I really apreciate all of you on this site. I know there is promise for the future. I am 32 and ready to face the world!  God bless.
59
I Just Tested Poz / Re: There's a chance I'm infected. How do I stay calm?
« Last post by Wade on Yesterday at 09:35:18 AM »
Hi JayJay
I can only repeat what the others have said.
Your numbers are not bad at all, treatment being what it is these days
you will go on to lead a long and happy and productive life.
Keep us all posted and Welcome ,

Best, Wade
60
Am I Infected? / Re: Possible HIV Infection: Symptoms, Fears & Trying to Cope
« Last post by Wade on Yesterday at 08:53:55 AM »
Hi
I can only repeat what I have already told you no penetration= no risk .
Your doctor apparently agreed .
Continue to work with your therapist and doctor.

Best, Wade
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 10

Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2016 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.